10. The Power of the Purse: Hubbard Library

Sign Number: 10 Location: Union and Second St. Method of Display: Steel post in front Women in 19th Century Hallowell didn’t have the vote or a presence in many of the professions but they did wield power and influence. In 1868 they began to raise funds for the purchase of property and the construction of a...

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Sign Number: 9 Old Hallowell Granite office Location: Union St. in front of old Hallowell Granite office (Brahms/Mount) Union St. Method of Display: affixed to granite post Permits/permissions required, date obtained: Brahms/Mount Hallowell’s high quality white granite was prized at an early date as material for...

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8. Dr. Hubbard Office

Posted in Uncategorized by  •  February 14, 2014

Dr Hubbard House Second St. Dr. John Hubbard Junior started practicing medicine in Hallowell in 1830. He graduated from Dartmouth College and the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. The building, an authentic nineteenth century doctor’s office, was closed on his death in 1869 and...

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MUSEUM IN THE STREETS The steamer Della Collins leaves the Eastern Steamship dock in Hallowell bound for Augusta.   Sign Number: 1 Location: Waterfront Park The rapids in Augusta that mark the “head of tide” made Hallowell the last port on the Kennebec able to accommodate larger ocean-going ships. By...

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2. From the Ashes

Posted in Museum in the Streets by  •  April 29, 2013

MUSEUM IN THE STREETS Torrent Company.   Sign Number: 2 Location: Valle Real Estate Building Winthrop and Water St. James Ingraham's residence and grocery store occupied this site in the early 1800's.  It was a favorite gathering spot for the men in town and famous for its stock of rum and fine wines. ...

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4. A Cure for Smallpox

Posted in Museum in the Streets by  •  April 27, 2013

Second and Lincoln Sts Dr. Benjamin Page. Dr.Benjamin Page, one of the first physicians to practice medicine in Hallowell, lived here. Dr. Page was an associate of Dr. Benjamin Vaughan who followed discoveries in science and medicine. Dr. Vaughan learned of the successful experiments of London surgeon Dr....

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Ebenezer Dole House Second and Lincoln Sts. Ebenezer Dole, his brother Daniel and others, met here on November 18, 1833 and formed the first anti-slavery society in Maine known as The Hallowell Anti-Slavery Society. A year earlier Dole contacted William Lloyd Garrison, publisher of the Boston abolitionist...

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Sign Number: 10
Location: Union and Second St.
Method of Display: Steel post in front

Sign10-1Women in 19th Century Hallowell didn’t have the vote or a presence in many of the professions but they did wield power and influence. In 1868 they began to raise funds for the purchase of property and the construction of a library. In 1880 their dreams were realized when this, the first public library building in the State of Maine, was erected. Designed by A.C. Currier and built with granite donated by the Bodwell Granite Company, it is often mistaken for a chapel or church. Gifts from Gen. Thomas Hubbard and Eliza Clark Lowell added two graceful wings to the original design. prompting admirers to label it “The Jewel of Second Street.” In November of 1937 a train derailment seriously damaged the building but it was rebuilt to its original beauty.

Sign10Le pouvoir de l’argent
Les femmes au 19ème siècle n’avaient ni droit de vote ni accès à de nombreuses professions mais elles ne manquaient pas de pouvoir ou d’influence. En 1868, elles commencèrent à rassembler des fonds pour l’acquisition d’un terrain et la construction d’une bibliothèque. En 1880, leur rêve se réalisa avec la construction de cette bibliothèque publique, la première du Maine. Conçue par A. C. Currier et bâtie en granit offert par la Bodwell Granite Company, on la confond souvent avec une chapelle ou une église. Grâce aux dons du Gén. Thomas Hubbard et Eliza Clark Lowell, on put ajouter deux ailes gracieuses au plan original, ce qui lui donna la réputation de “Bijou de la Deuxième Rue.” En novembre 1937, un déraillement ferroviaire endommagea gravement le bâtiment mais on le reconstruisit dans toute sa beauté.

Photograph(s)/illustration(s):
S10-01 “Unwanted visitor.”
Un visiteur malvenu.
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection – Photographer unknown

S10-02 “ Gen. Thomas Hubbard”
[no translation needed]
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection – Harold Strout

The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Century 21 Alliance Reality

Sign Sponsor – Friends of the Hubbard Free Library

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available online at www. hallowell.org

Sign Number: 9 Old Hallowell Granite office
Location: Union St. in front of old Hallowell Granite office (Brahms/Mount) Union St.
Method of Display: affixed to granite post
Permits/permissions required, date obtained: Brahms/Mount
Sign9-1Hallowell’s high quality white granite was prized at an early date as material for public monuments and statuary and orders were filled for cities throughout the United States. The statue “Faith” atop the National Monument to the Forefathers at Plymouth, Massachusetts, was sculpted at Hallowell. Many of the public buildings in New York City, including the Hall of Records and the Metropolitan Art Museum, were built using Hallowell Granite. The Marshall Field Building and the Post Office in Chicago, Ill. were large contracts, but the largest single contract was with the State of New York for the State Capitol at Albany, from 1867-1898, which totaled 25 million dollars.

Sign9L’âge d’or du Granit de Hallowell
Le granit blanc de haute qualité de Hallowell fut vite prisé pour la construction de monuments publics et de statues. On remplissait des commandes pour tous les Etats-Unis. La statue Faith au sommet du Monument National qui célèbre les premiers arrivants à Plymouth, Massachussetts, fut sculptée à Hallowell. Beaucoup de bâtiments publics à New York, comme le Hall of Records et le Musée d’Art Métropolitain furent bâtis avec le granit de Hallowell. Le bâtiment de Marshall Field et la Poste à Chicago, Illinois, représentaient des contrats importants, mais le plus gros fut signé avec l’état de New York pour le Capitole à Albany, de 1867 à 1898, pour 25 millions de dollars.

Photograph(s)/illustration(s):
S9-01SC – “The granite yard.”
Tailleurs de granit
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection – Photographer unknown

S9-02 – “Loading carvings for shipment.”
Chargement de statues à expédier.
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection – Photographer unknown

S9-03 “Office of Hallowell Granite Works”
Bureaux de Hallowell Granite Works.
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection – Photographer unknown

Sponsor Copy

The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Vallee Real Estate.

Sign Sponsor – Brahms/Mount Textiles

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available online at www. hallowell.org

Dr Hubbard House Second St.
Sign8-1Dr. John Hubbard Junior started practicing medicine in Hallowell in 1830. He graduated from Dartmouth College and the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. The building, an authentic nineteenth century doctor’s office, was closed on his death in 1869 and remained on the Hubbard Farm until being moved to here in 1989. Dr. Hubbard served as the governor of Maine in the early 1850’s, signing the “Maine Law” for the “Suppression of Drinking Houses and Tippling Shops” making Maine the first in the nation to enact prohibition. His family continued to contribute to Hallowell after his death . Son Thomas, a graduate of Bowdoin College and a successful New York railroad lawyer, donated the first addition to what is now the Hubbard Free Library in 1893.

Le cabinet médical du Dr. Hubbard

Sign8Dr. John Hubbard Junior s’établit comme médecin à Hallowell en 1830. Il avait fait ses études à Dartmouth College et sa médecine à l’Université de Pennsylvanie à Philadelphie. Le bâtiment, un cabinet médical authentique du dix-neuvième siècle, fut fermé à sa mort en 1869 et resta à la ferme Hubbard jusqu’à son transport ici en 1989. Dr. Hubbard fut Gouverneur du Maine au début des années 1850 et signa une loi, la Maine Law, pour la suppression des tavernes et magasins de boisson qui fit du Maine le premier état du pays à appliquer la prohibition. Sa famille continua à contribuer à Hallowell après sa mort. Son fils Thomas, diplômé de Bowdoin College et avocat prospère pour les chemins de fer de New York, offrit en 1893 une nouvelle aile à la bibliothèque qui porte aujourd’hui son nom.

Photograph(s)/illustration(s) – Captions

S8-01 “Dr. Hubbard”
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection

S8-02 – “Dr. Hubbard’s instruments.”
Les instruments du Dr. Hubbard.
Credit – Hubbard Museum Collection – Harold Strout

The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Hattie’s Chowder House.
This panel is sponsored by Rebecca Jane Perry and the Perry Family

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available online at www. hallowell.org

MUSEUM IN THE STREETS

Credit – Hubbard Free Library

The steamer Della Collins leaves the Eastern Steamship dock in Hallowell bound for Augusta.

 

Sign Number: 1
Location: Waterfront Park

The rapids in Augusta that mark the “head of tide” made Hallowell the last port on the Kennebec able to accommodate larger ocean-going ships. By 1810 thirteen major wharves lined the riverbank, some extending more than 50 feet out into the river. Hallowell fast became a major transportation hub for all of central Maine. Large warehouses stored the goods that awaited shipment on the Coos Trail (Winthrop Street) and the Canada Road (Route 201). As early as 1794 brigs, schooners and sloops as well as small passenger ships called “packets” provided regular service to Boston. Steamboats of all sizes plied the river until the early years of the 20th Century when railroads and automobiles finally ended the heyday of Hallowell’s maritime commerce.

Credit – Arthur Moore Collection

Frank Nassen, ferryman, and dog Zuki, rowed patrons across the river from 1931 until his death in 1960.

 

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The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group. 

The project was underwritten by Hattie’s Chowder House.

 Sign Sponsor – Quirk Ford, Augusta

MUSEUM IN THE STREETS

Credit – Unknown photographer  (Historic Hallowell (HH) pg 62)

Torrent Company.

 

Sign Number: 2
Location: Valle Real Estate Building Winthrop and Water St.

James Ingraham’s residence and grocery store occupied this site in the early 1800’s.  It was a favorite gathering spot for the men in town and famous for its stock of rum and fine wines.  Both the home and the business were destroyed in the Great Fire of 1826. City Hall stands today where the residence was located.

Credit - Mahoney Collection

Faceplate of Hallowell’s first library.

 

This present brick building was built the same year and has since housed a hardware business, the American Advocate newspaper, the Hallowell Social Library, the City fire station and the lodge of the International Order of Odd Fellows.  The son of James Ingraham, Rev. J.H. Ingraham, was a popular 19th Century writer who wrote novels with biblical themes.  He was one of the first American writers to sell over a million copies of his work.

 

 

Credit – A. Moore Collection

Fire Company with hose tower.

 

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The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group. 

The project was underwritten Vallee Real Estate.

Sign Sponsor – Quality Copy

 

Second and Lincoln StsavJG_R93jfpVZMfaQnhbyBgV2ALRSJ4rS9FQINnpFdA

Credit – Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

Dr. Benjamin Page.

Dr.Benjamin Page, one of the first physicians to practice medicine in Hallowell, lived here. Dr. Page was an associate of Dr. Benjamin Vaughan who followed discoveries in science and medicine. Dr. Vaughan learned of the successful experiments of London surgeon Dr. Edward Jenner in developing a vaccine against smallpox.

Portrait du Dr. Benjamin Vaughan

Dr. Benjamin Vaughan.

In 1800, Dr. Vaughan obtained samples of the vaccine from Dr. Jenner and provided them to Dr. Page, who administered them here in one of the first field trials of an experimental vaccine in the history of American medicine. Results were reported to Jenner in London and helped win Parliamentary approval for widespread distribution of the vaccine. Dr. Vaughan did not practice medicine, but collaborated with Dr. Page assisting when a yellow fever epidemic threatened Hallowell.

 

 

Credit – James Gillray

Smallpox and Inoculation Hospital at St. Pancras,

The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Group.

The project was underwritten by Eric & Pamela Perry & the Perry Family
This panel is sponsored by Hannah Young Perry and the Perry Family

 

Sign5-1
Ebenezer Dole House Second and Lincoln Sts.

Ebenezer Dole, his brother Daniel and others, met here on November 18, 1833 and formed the first anti-slavery society in Maine known as The Hallowell Anti-Slavery Society. A year earlier Dole contacted William Lloyd Garrison, publisher of the Boston abolitionist newspaper The Liberator, and invited him to speak at Old South Church in Hallowell. When Garrison was jailed in Baltimore for his anti-slavery activity, Dole sent $100 to pay his fine and support his work. Dole was also a founding member of the Maine Anti-Slavery Society. James Gow, another Old South Church Deacon, is said to have provided asylum to the first fugitive slave who passed through Hallowell.

Sign5Refuge pour les opprimés
Ebenezer Dole, son frère Daniel et d’autres, se réunirent ici le 18 novembre 1833 pour fonder la première société anti-esclavagiste du Maine connue sous le nom de Hallowell Anti-Slavery Society. L’année précédente, Dole contacta William Lloyd Garrison, l’éditeur du journal abolitionniste de Boston The Liberator, et l’invita à parler à l’église Old South Church à Hallowell. Quand Garrison fut emprisonné pour son activité anti-esclavagiste, Dole lui envoya 100 dollars afin de payer son amende et l’aider dans son travail. Dole fut aussi l’un des fondateurs de la Maine Anti-Slavery Society. On dit que James Gow, un autre diacre de l’église Old South Church abrita le premier esclave fugitif passant par Hallowell.

S5-01 – 4×6 – “Deacon Dole”
Le diacre Dole
Credit – Hallowell on the Kennebec

S5-02 – 5 ½ x 6 – “A young black couple from Hallowell.”
Un jeune couple noir de Hallowell
Credit – Maine Historical Society

S5-03 – “The Liberator” Newspaper
Credit – Hubbard Free Library

The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Hattie’s Chowder House.
This panel is sponsored by Matthew Race Perry and the Perry Family

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and additional information about Hallowell are available online at www.hallowell.org