Hallowell Glass Plate Photographs

Hallowell Glass Plate Photographs

Posted in Uncategorized by  •  March 4, 2016

As part of Hallowell's Museum In The Street Project, the Historic Hallowell Committee purchased twenty-seven photographs printed from  glass plate negatives that are part of the Eastern Illustrating and Publishing Company collection housed at the Penobscot Marine Museum. Founded in Belfast, Maine, in 1909, the...

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At the Town Meeting of April 5, 1819, Hallowell voters approved a warrant “to see if the Town will give directions for building a Magazine for the safe keeping of powder”.  By June of 1820 the Powder House building  was erected here on Couch’s Ledge, land owned by Ebenezer T. Warren, and once owned by John...

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Sign Number: 7 Location: Second St. Method of Display: Attached to building North Side Permits/permissions required, date obtained: Town Properties LLC , 245 River Road, Topsham, ME 04086 Row House, built in approximately 1840 by Isaac Gage, is the sole remaining example in Maine of a wooden row house, a...

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17. Wilson Hall

Posted in Museum in the Streets by  •  February 19, 2014

Location: Liberal Cup Building Perley Lane Method of Display: Affixed to buildingWilson Hall (this building) was built by Charles Wilson in 1872 at a cost of $10,000 “in answer to popular demand for a place of public amusement”. The first floor was occupied by a meat and provisions market; the second floor housed...

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Sign Number: 15 Location: Boynton’s Market Method of Display: affixed to building Henry Pope Clearwater was a pharmacist who identified himself as Dr. Clearwater and began his career at the City Drug Store on Water Street. Around 1900, Dr. Clearwater started a successful mail-order patent-medicine business,...

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14. Hallowell Cotton Mill

Posted in Museum in the Streets by  •  February 19, 2014

Sign Number: 14 Location: Cotton Mill Apartments north west corner Method of Display: Steel pole The availability of cheap cotton from the South in the pre-Civil War years prompted local businessmen to construct a spinning mill here in 1845. During a typical week, it used 35 bales of cotton shipped from New...

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6. Hallowell House

Posted in Museum in the Streets by  •  February 19, 2014

Hallowell house was designed and built by John D. Lord, who had previously supervised the construction of the Maine State Capitol building. Construction began in 1832 in the hope that it might swing favor towards Hallowell becoming the Capital of the newly annexed state. The hotel became home to legislators and...

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3. Hallowell City Hall

Posted in Museum in the Streets by  •  February 18, 2014

MUSEUM IN THE STREETS Eliza Clark Lowell, City Hall’s Major Benefactor.   Sign Number: 3 Location: City Hall 1 Winthrop St. In 1898-99, Eliza Clark Lowell, great granddaughter of Hallowell’s first settler Deacon Pease Clark, donated $20,000 for the construction of a City Hall.  She said, “Build it...

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19. Sheppard’s Point

Posted in Museum in the Streets by  •  February 14, 2014

Kennebec Turnout Sheppard’s Point, the small peninsula located where Vaughan Stream enters the Kennebec River, was first settled by Briggs Hallowell, who built a house there to look after the business interests of his father, Benjamin Hallowell. Commercial activity flourished on the Point. A brewery and...

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18. Life Long Learning

Posted in Museum in the Streets by  •  February 14, 2014

Sign Number: 18 Location: Key Bank Building Method of Display: Attached to Building Hallowell’s early settlers brought their passion for education to their new home. The first town meeting in 1771 voted funds for public schools. A private school, The Hallowell Academy, founded in 1795, offered a top rate...

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As part of Hallowell’s Museum In The Street Project, the Historic Hallowell Committee purchased twenty-seven photographs printed from  glass plate negatives that are part of the Eastern Illustrating and Publishing Company collection housed at the Penobscot Marine Museum.

Founded in Belfast, Maine, in 1909, the Eastern Illustrating & Publishing Co. published “real photo postcards” with images taken by its own photographers throughout New England. The negatives, mostly on old-style glass plates, represent a fragile and irreplaceable record of the region’s physical and cultural history up to the early 1950s. The Eastern collection is one of the largest and most significant coherent collections of historic photography from this region and era and is a valuable resource for educators, historians, genealogists, and anyone interested in New England history. Currently the collection contains more than 40,000 negatives.

The 8×10 inch photographs were added to the Hubbard Library collection. You can learn more about the Eastern Illustrating and Publishing Company by clicking this link.

1.Tucks Corner, now Vallee Real Estate.

100942

2. Old Hallowell from Chelsea Heights.

100941

3. Tucks Corner southwest, the old Key Bank Building now Hattie’s Chowder House.

116931

4.  North Hallowell from Chelsea.

113305

5. The Maine Central Railroad Station with the Johnson Shoe Factory building barely visible on the right.

112619

6.Hallowell Granite Company quarry filled with water.

106661

7.Granite Hill out Central Street in Hallowell.

106660

8.Central Hallowell from Chelsea.

106659

9. Log boom and North Hallowell beyond.

106658

10. North Hallowell from Chelsea.

106657

11.Bodwell Mansion.

101610

12. Johnson ShoE Factory on Central Street across from the Hubbard Free Library.

101609

13. Looking northeast from Union Street along Water Street.

101608

14.Corner of Union Street looking north on the west side of Water Street.

101607

15.Central School on Middle Street.

101605

16.Hubbard Free Library on Second Street.

101604

17.Second Street northeast side.

101603

18. Hallowell House

101602

19.Hallowell Granite quarry.

101601

20. Hallowell Granite Quarry

101600

21. Vaughan Brook Auto Bridge.

101599

22. Stephens School

101592

23. Hallowell City Hall

100944

24. Cobble stone shed Hallowell Granite Company

.100943

25.

26.

 

sign-20At the Town Meeting of April 5, 1819, Hallowell voters approved a warrant “to see if the Town will give directions for building a Magazine for the safe keeping of powder”.  By June of 1820 the Powder House building  was erected here on Couch’s Ledge, land owned by Ebenezer T. Warren, and once owned by John Couch, a Revolutionary War veteran.  On June 19, 1820, Warren conveyed the land and building to the “Inhabitants of Hallowell” for $30.  On December 29, 1947, the City of Hallowell gifted the Powder House to the Mary Kelton Dummer Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and on April 11, 2002, it was entered in the National Register of Historic Places.

Sign20-locationLe 5 avril 1819, le Conseil Municipal de Hallowell vote une délibération exhortant la ville à construire une réserve pour y stocker de la poudre à canon.  La poudrière est construite en juin 1820 ici, sur Couch’s Ledge, sur un terrain appartenant à Ebenezer T. Warren ; autrefois propriété de John Couch, vétéran de la Guerre d’Indépendance. Le 19 juin 1820, Warren cède le terrain et bâtiment aux  « habitants de Hallowell » pour la somme de 30 dollars. Le 29 décembre 1947, la ville de Hallowell fait don de la poudrière au chapitre Mary Kelton Dummer des Filles de la Révolution Américaine et, le 11 avril 2002, le bâtiment est inscrit au Registre National des Bâtiments Historiques.

This cannon, also known as the “Beeman Cannon”, was originally part of the armament of the British Navy brig HMS Boxer which was captured by the USS Enterprise in a sea battle off Portland during the War of 1812.  About 1837 a group of local businessmen, led by John Beeman, purchased the cannon in Portland and brought it to Hallowell.  It was placed on a gun carriage and converted to a field  piece.  Today it serves as a memorial to the Hallowell Light Infantry and Hallowell Artillery Company.  Both units were organized as part of the 8th Division of the Massachusetts Militia and served during the Revolutionary War and War of 1812.  For many years the gun was fired during community celebrations.

Ce canon, également connu sous le nom de « Beaman Cannon » fait à l’origine partie de l’armement du brick HMS Boxer de la Marine Britannique qui est capturé en combat naval par le USS Entreprise non loin de Portland pendant la guerre de 1812. Un groupe d’hommes d’affaires locaux, sous la houlette de John Beeman, achète le canon à Portland et le transporte à Hallowell vers 1837. On l’installe sur un porte-canon pour en faire une pièce d’artillerie. Aujourd’hui Il commémore l’Infanterie Légère ainsi que le Bataillon d’Artillerie de Hallowell. Ces deux unités font partie de la 8ème division de la Milice du Massachusetts qui participe à la Guerre d’Indépendance et celle de 1812. Pendant de nombreuses années, ce canon tire des salves à l’occasion de la fête nationale.

 

Sign Number: 7
Location: Second St.
Method of Display: Attached to building North Side
Permits/permissions required, date obtained:
Town Properties LLC , 245 River Road, Topsham, ME 04086

Sign7Row House, built in approximately 1840 by Isaac Gage, is the sole remaining example in Maine of a wooden row house, a typical form of labor housing in the early 19th century. Immigrant stone cutters who worked on Hallowell granite lived here, as did employees of the nearby Cotton Mill and Johnson Shoe Company. The five tenements were restored by Row House, Inc., in 1969 and placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1970. The method of construction, woodwork, nails and hardware serve as a laboratory for the study of early American architectural standards employed in this form of labor housing.

Un joli immeuble ouvrier
Le bâtiment de Row House, construit vers 1840 par Isaac Gage, est le seul exemple intact du Maine constitué de maisons de bois contigües, typique de certains logements ouvriers au début du 19ème siècle. Des tailleurs de pierre immigrés qui travaillaient le granit à Hallowell et des ouvriers de l’Usine de Coton et de Chaussures Johnson y habitaient. Les cinq logements de cet immeuble ont été restaurés par Row House Inc. en 1969 et mis sur le National Register of Historic Places en 1970. La méthode de construction, le travail du bois et les matériaux employés permettent l’étude des techniques originales d’architecture américaine pour ce type de logement ouvrier.

Photograph(s)/illustration(s) – Captions
S7-01 “Workers at Hallowell Granite were among the Row House tenants.”
Des ouvriers de Hallowell Granite louaient des logements à Row House.
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection

S7-02 “The brick oven in a Row House basement kitchen.”
Le four en briques dans une cuisine au sous-sol de Row House.
Credit – Nancy McGinnis
S7-03 – “Stitchers at Johnson Shoe”
Couseuses pour les chaussures Johnson.
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection

Sponsor Copy
The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Century 21 Alliance Reality.
Sign Sponsor – Pine State Trading Company

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available online at www. hallowell.org

File: 7-Row House

Location: Liberal Cup Building Perley Lane
Sign17Method of Display: Affixed to buildingWilson Hall (this building) was built by Charles Wilson in 1872 at a cost of $10,000 “in answer to popular demand for a place of public amusement”. The first floor was occupied by a meat and provisions market; the second floor housed a dining room, two drawings rooms, a clothes room and a ticket office for the third floor theater. The Acme Theater, which seated 1,200 people, still exists today on the top floor of the building. During its heyday it hosted theatricals, vaudeville productions, minstrel shows, school commencements, dances, concerts and movies. Prior to operating Wilson Hall, Charles Wilson was associated with William Wilson and Joseph Bodwell in the operation of the Hallowell Granite Company, which was established in 1865.

Wilson Hall

Wilson Hall fut construit par Charles Wilson en 1872 pour la somme de 10 000$  « afin de répondre à la population qui demandait un lieu public de divertissement.”  Le rez-de-chaussée était occupé par une boucherie et un marché; Le premier étage offrait une salle de restauration, deux salons, un vestiaire et une billetterie pour le théâtre situé au dessus. Le Théâtre Acme, de 1 200 places, existe encore à l’étage supérieur du bâtiment. Pendant son âge d’or, il accueillit des représentations théâtrales, du vaudeville, des musiciens, remises de diplômes, bals, concerts et films. Avant de gérer Wilson Hall, Charles Wilson avait été l’associé de William Wilson et Joseph Bodwell dans l’exploitation de la Hallowell Granite Company qui avait été établie en 1865.

Photograph(s)/illustration(s) – Captions
S17-01 12 x 9 “Acme Theater Poster”
Affiche du théâtre Acme.
Credit – Lund Collection

S17-02 – “Acme Theater Ticket”
Billet du théâtre Acme
Credit – A.Moore Collection

Sponsor Copy

The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Eric & Pamela Perry & the Perry Family.
Sign Sponsor – The Liberal Cup

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available online at www. hallowell.org

Sign Number: 15
Location: Boynton’s Market
Method of Display: affixed to building

Sign15-1Henry Pope Clearwater was a pharmacist who identified himself as Dr. Clearwater and began his career at the City Drug Store on Water Street. Around 1900, Dr. Clearwater started a successful mail-order patent-medicine business, named the Heart Cure Co. One of his most successful products was a liniment called Joint-Ease. A pioneer in mail-order and radio advertising, he placed regular advertisements in the New York Times and Chicago Tribune. He employed 100 workers and each day shipped a baggage car full of his preparations to places as far away as Great Britain and Africa. The Hallowell Post Office was built in 1932 primarily to handle as many as 25,000 of his circulars and responses each day. At one point his facility occupied an entire block on Water Street.

L’entreprise Heart Cure Co. – Les laboratoires Pope

Sign15Henry Pope Clearwater était un pharmacien qui se faisait appeler Dr. Clearwater et commença sa carrière au City Drug Store dans Water Street. Vers 1900, Dr. Clearwater créa avec succès une entreprise, la Heart Cure Co. Un de ses produits les plus populaires était un onguent appelé Joint-Ease. En pionnier de la vente par correspondance et de la publicité à la radio, il plaçait régulièrement des annonces dans le New York Times et le Chicago Tribune. Il employait 100 ouvriers et expédiait chaque jour un wagon plein de ses remèdes jusqu’en Grande Bretagne et Afrique. La Poste de Hallowell fut construite en 1932 principalement pour faire face à ses quelques 25 000 circulaires et envois quotidiens. A son apogée, son entreprise occupa un bloc entier de Water Street.

Photograph(s)/illustration(s) – Captions
S15-01CRC – “Clearwater Pharmacy”
La pharmacie Clearwater.
Credcit – Hubbard Free Library Collection – Photographer unknown

S15-05 – “ Newspaper ad”
Publicité dans un journal.
Credit – Webber Collection
S15-03 – Joint-Ease, Oint Ease
[no translation needed]
Credit – Trask Collection –

Sponsor Copy

The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Vallee Real Estate.
Sign Sponsor – Kennebec Valley Art Association

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available online at www. hallowell.org

Sign Number: 14
Location: Cotton Mill Apartments north west corner
Method of Display: Steel pole

Sign14-1The availability of cheap cotton from the South in the pre-Civil War years prompted local businessmen to construct a spinning mill here in 1845. During a typical week, it used 35 bales of cotton shipped from New Orleans and burned 30 tons of coal. About 200 employees produced 43,000 yards of fabric on 215 looms. The first steam engine used here was built by the McClench Iron Works at Sheppard’s Point. The finished cloth sold for 6 cents a yard, and each employee made 62 cents a day. The mill ceased operation in the 1890’s as many textile manufacturers moved south. Shoe companies occupied the building from 1920 to 1966. It was little used until the Federal Advisory Council on Historic Preservation teamed with HUD in 1979 to transform the building into apartments for the elderly.

Sign14Le moulin de coton à Hallowell
L’abondance de coton bon marché au Sud des Etats-Unis avant la guerre civile poussa les hommes d’affaires locaux à construire un moulin de tissage de coton ici en 1845. Durant une semaine normale de travail, on utilisait 35 balles de coton importé de La Nouvelle-Orléans et brûlait 30 tonnes de charbon. La première locomotive à vapeur utilisée dans le moulin fut construite par la sidérurgie McClench à Sheppard’s Point. Environ 200 employés produisaient 43 000 mètres de tissu par semaine sur 215 métiers à tisser. Le tissu fini était vendu pour 6 centimes le mètre, et chaque employé gagnait 62 centimes par jour. Le moulin de coton cessa son activité dans les années 1890, comme beaucoup de manufactures textiles qui s’installèrent au Sud des Etats-Unis. Des fabriques de chaussures occupèrent alors le bâtiment de 1920 à 1966. Par la suite, le bâtiment resta presque vacant jusqu’en 1979, quand le Conseil Fédéral pour la Préservation Historique, en collaboration avec HUD (Logement et Développement Urbain), aménagea le bâtiment en appartements pour personnes âgées.

Photograph(s)/illustration(s) – Caption
S14-01 4 ½ x 4 ½ – “Cotton Mill Complex probably taken from the steeple of the South Congregational Church”
Vue du Moulin de Coton, sans doute prise du clocher de l’église South Congregational.

S14-02 – 8 ½ x 6 3/4 “Worker in the Cotton Mill.”
Ouvrier dans le Moulin de Coton.
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection – Photographer unknown
Interior of Cotton Mill (AH – HLC pg 59)

Sponsor Copy

The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Century 21 Alliance Reality.
Sign Sponsor – Cotton Mill Associates

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available nline at www. hallowell.org

Sign6
Hallowell house was designed and built by John D. Lord, who had previously supervised the construction of the Maine State Capitol building. Construction began in 1832 in the hope that it might swing favor towards Hallowell becoming the Capital of the newly annexed state. The hotel became home to legislators and hosted visits by Daniel Webster, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Theodore Roosevelt and L.L. Bean. It boasted a restaurant, a ballroom, and barber shop, as well as a bank and post office. There were fireplaces in each room, high ceilings and winding stair cases. From the 1920’s to the 1950’s the hotel was known as the Worster House and was famous for its fine restaurant and hospitality.

Hallowell House
Hallowell House fut construit par l’architecte John D. Lord qui avait supervisé la construction du capitole de l’Etat de Maine. La construction commença en 1832 dans l’espoir que Hallowell deviendrait la capitale du nouvel état. L’hôtel hébergea de nombreux législateurs et reçut la visite de Daniel Webster, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Thedore Roosevelt et L.L. Bean. L’hôtel possédait un restaurant, salle de danse, coiffeur, ainsi qu’une banque et un bureau de poste. Il y avait des cheminées dans chaque chambre, de hauts plafonds et des escaliers majestueux. Entre les années vingt et cinquante l’hôtel, connu sous le nom de Worster House, était renommé pour la qualité de son restaurant et de son hospitalité.

Photograph(s)/illustration(s) – Captions

S6-01 – 4 1/2×3 ½ – Promotional Card
Credit Carla Worster Gilley Collection

S6-03 – 10 ½ x 7 ½ – “Worster House Dining Room”
La salle à manger de Worster House
Credit Karla Worster Gilley Collection

S6-04 “Worster House Menu”
Un menu à Worster House
Credit Carla Worster Gilley Collection
If this
Sponsor Copy
The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Eric & Pamela Perry & the Perry Family

This Panel was sponsored by Granite Hill Estates

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available online at www. hallowell.org

MUSEUM IN THE STREETS

Credit – City of Hallowell, photographer unknown

Eliza Clark Lowell, City Hall’s Major Benefactor.

 

Sign Number: 3
Location: City Hall 1 Winthrop St.

In 1898-99, Eliza Clark Lowell, great granddaughter of Hallowell’s first settler Deacon Pease Clark, donated $20,000 for the construction of a City Hall.  She said, “Build it strong that it may last for years to come.”

Its auditorium served as a venue for school assemblies, dances and graduation ceremonies until the high school was built, and hosting variety shows, theatricals and other community events.

A century later, Row House, Inc. teamed with the City to renovate the beautiful old building for its centennial celebration. The exterior was sandblasted and the structure made fully accessible. Electrical and heating systems were updated. The cyprus wood interior was refinished.  Original Victorian paint colors were reproduced throughout the building, restoring it to its former beauty.

Credit – Quinn Collection, photographer unknown

Sacred Heart May Celebration – 1920s.

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The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group. 

The project was underwritten by Vaughan Homestead Foundation. 

Sign Sponsor – Row House, Inc.

Kennebec Turnout

Sign19Sheppard’s Point, the small peninsula located where Vaughan Stream enters the Kennebec River, was first settled by Briggs Hallowell, who built a house there to look after the business interests of his father, Benjamin Hallowell. Commercial activity flourished on the Point. A brewery and distillery established by John Sheppard was said to produce enough malt liquor to supply all of New England. By 1793 Charles and Benjamin Vaughan built a flour mill. In later years an iron works, machine shop, lumber yard and sandpaper mill were located there making the south end of town the industrial center of early Hallowell. In the late 19th Century the Knickerbocker Ice Company operated a large ice house on the point and shipped Kennebec River ice to customers around the world.

Sheppard’s Point
La pointe de Sheppard’s Point, située là où le ruisseau de Vaughan se jette dans la Kennebec, fut d’abord colonisée par Briggs Hallowell qui y construisit une maison afin d’y gérer les affaires de son père, Benjamin Hallowell. Une grande activité commerciale s’y développa. On disait qu’une brasserie et distillerie établies par John Sheppard produisaient assez de bière pour approvisionner toute la Nouvelle Angleterre. En 1793 Charles et Benjamin Vaughan y construisirent un moulin à farine. Plus tard, une forge, un atelier d’usinage, une scierie et un moulin à papier de verre s’y installèrent, faisant du sud de la ville le centre industriel de Hallowell à ses débuts. A la fin du 19ème siècle, l’entreprise Knickerbocker Ice Company gérait une grande maison à glace sur la pointe et expédiait de la glace par la Kennebec à des clients du monde entier.

Photograph(s)/illustration(s):
S19-01S – Sandpaper mill crew”
Ouvriers de l’usine à papier de verre
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection – Photographer unknown

S19-02C “Sheppard’s Point looking north.”
Sheppard’s Point face au nord.
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection – Photographer unknown

Sponsor Copy
The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Eric & Pamela Perry & the Perry Family

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available online at www. hallowell.org

Sign Number: 18
Location: Key Bank Building
Method of Display: Attached to Building

Sign18Hallowell’s early settlers brought their passion for education to their new home. The first town meeting in 1771 voted funds for public schools. A private school, The Hallowell Academy, founded in 1795, offered a top rate classical curriculum with a program in advanced mathematics and navigation for boys wishing to pursue careers at sea. Ezekiel Goodale opened “The Hallowell Bookstore – Sign of the Bible” in 1802, the first bookstore east of Portland. In 1815 it moved to No. 1 Kennebec Row, the brick building with the granite flood marker at the corner of Water and Wharf streets. By 1820 five major bookstores lined Water Street and made Hallowell a key component of the “Boston Book Trade” – supplying textbooks to schoolmasters and reading material of all kinds to the general public.

Importance de l’instruction

Les premiers colons de Hallowell transmirent leur goût des études à leur nouvelle patrie. En 1771 le premier conseil municipal appropria des fonds pour les écoles publiques. Un lycée privé fondé en 1795, Hallowell Academy, offrait un excellent programme classique ainsi que des cours de mathématiques avancées et de navigation pour les garçons se destinant à la marine. Ezekiel Goodale ouvrit en 1802 la première librairie à l’est de Portland, The Hallowell Bookstore-Sign of the Bible. En 1815 elle déménagea au No. 1 du Kennebec Row, dans le bâtiment en briques au coin des rues Water et Wharf qui porte la marque en granit du niveau des inondations. En 1820 cinq librairies importantes se trouvaient dans Water Street et firent jouer à Hallowell un rôle clé dans le marché du livre de Boston en fournissant des manuels scolaires aux écoles et toutes sortes de livres au grand public.

Photograph(s)/illustration(s):

S18-01 – “Hallowell Academy”
[no translation needed]
Credit – Hubbard Free Library – Photographer unknown

S18-02 – “Books published in Hallowell”
Livres publiés à Hallowell
Credit – Hubbard Free Library – Harold Strout

Sponsor Copy

The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Century 21 Alliance.
Sign Sponsor – MaxMedia

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available online at www. hallowell.org