15. The Heart Cure Co. – Pope Laboratories

Sign Number: 15 Location: Boynton’s Market Method of Display: affixed to building Henry Pope Clearwater was a pharmacist who identified himself as Dr. Clearwater and began his career at the City Drug Store on Water Street. Around 1900, Dr. Clearwater started a successful mail-order patent-medicine business,...

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14. Hallowell Cotton Mill

Posted in Museum in the Streets by  •  February 19, 2014

Sign Number: 14 Location: Cotton Mill Apartments north west corner Method of Display: Steel pole The availability of cheap cotton from the South in the pre-Civil War years prompted local businessmen to construct a spinning mill here in 1845. During a typical week, it used 35 bales of cotton shipped from New...

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6. Hallowell House

Posted in Museum in the Streets by  •  February 19, 2014

Hallowell house was designed and built by John D. Lord, who had previously supervised the construction of the Maine State Capitol building. Construction began in 1832 in the hope that it might swing favor towards Hallowell becoming the Capital of the newly annexed state. The hotel became home to legislators and...

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3. Hallowell City Hall

Posted in Museum in the Streets by  •  February 18, 2014

MUSEUM IN THE STREETS Eliza Clark Lowell, City Hall’s Major Benefactor.   Sign Number: 3 Location: City Hall 1 Winthrop St. In 1898-99, Eliza Clark Lowell, great granddaughter of Hallowell’s first settler Deacon Pease Clark, donated $20,000 for the construction of a City Hall.  She said, “Build it...

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19. Sheppard’s Point

Posted in Museum in the Streets by  •  February 14, 2014

Kennebec Turnout Sheppard’s Point, the small peninsula located where Vaughan Stream enters the Kennebec River, was first settled by Briggs Hallowell, who built a house there to look after the business interests of his father, Benjamin Hallowell. Commercial activity flourished on the Point. A brewery and...

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18. Life Long Learning

Posted in Museum in the Streets by  •  February 14, 2014

Sign Number: 18 Location: Key Bank Building Method of Display: Attached to Building Hallowell’s early settlers brought their passion for education to their new home. The first town meeting in 1771 voted funds for public schools. A private school, The Hallowell Academy, founded in 1795, offered a top rate...

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Location: Hallowell Printing The first newspaper published in Kennebec County, the Eastern Star, was printed in Hallowell by Howard S. Robinson on August 4,1794. In 1797 he published the first book of fiction printed in the District of Maine, “Female Friendship, or the Innocent Sufferer: A Moral Lecture”....

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13. A Seaport on the Kennebec

Posted in Museum in the Streets by  •  February 14, 2014

Location: Water Street State Boat landing In the early 1800's, it was said that if a Hallowell boy hadn’t been to the East or West Indies by the time he was 20, he “didn’t amount to much”. From 1785 to 1875, 229 ships were launched from her shipyards. Hallowell ships carried lumber and other products to the...

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Second St. Method of Display: Post Hallowell’s first meeting house was Old South Congregational Church. It was a wooden structure built in 1796 but destroyed by fire in 1878. Lost in the fire was the distinguished bell tower designed by Charles Bulfinch and the organ which had been imported from England. It was...

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Sign Number:11 Location: front of Hallowell Fire Station Method of Display: Affixed to Building Permits/permissions required, date obtained: City The Town House was built in 1828 and served as municipal offices, school, jail and community center. Sunday School programs were offered here as well as concerts,...

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Sign Number: 15
Location: Boynton’s Market
Method of Display: affixed to building

Sign15-1Henry Pope Clearwater was a pharmacist who identified himself as Dr. Clearwater and began his career at the City Drug Store on Water Street. Around 1900, Dr. Clearwater started a successful mail-order patent-medicine business, named the Heart Cure Co. One of his most successful products was a liniment called Joint-Ease. A pioneer in mail-order and radio advertising, he placed regular advertisements in the New York Times and Chicago Tribune. He employed 100 workers and each day shipped a baggage car full of his preparations to places as far away as Great Britain and Africa. The Hallowell Post Office was built in 1932 primarily to handle as many as 25,000 of his circulars and responses each day. At one point his facility occupied an entire block on Water Street.

L’entreprise Heart Cure Co. – Les laboratoires Pope

Sign15Henry Pope Clearwater était un pharmacien qui se faisait appeler Dr. Clearwater et commença sa carrière au City Drug Store dans Water Street. Vers 1900, Dr. Clearwater créa avec succès une entreprise, la Heart Cure Co. Un de ses produits les plus populaires était un onguent appelé Joint-Ease. En pionnier de la vente par correspondance et de la publicité à la radio, il plaçait régulièrement des annonces dans le New York Times et le Chicago Tribune. Il employait 100 ouvriers et expédiait chaque jour un wagon plein de ses remèdes jusqu’en Grande Bretagne et Afrique. La Poste de Hallowell fut construite en 1932 principalement pour faire face à ses quelques 25 000 circulaires et envois quotidiens. A son apogée, son entreprise occupa un bloc entier de Water Street.

Photograph(s)/illustration(s) – Captions
S15-01CRC – “Clearwater Pharmacy”
La pharmacie Clearwater.
Credcit – Hubbard Free Library Collection – Photographer unknown

S15-05 – “ Newspaper ad”
Publicité dans un journal.
Credit – Webber Collection
S15-03 – Joint-Ease, Oint Ease
[no translation needed]
Credit – Trask Collection –

Sponsor Copy

The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Vallee Real Estate.
Sign Sponsor – Kennebec Valley Art Association

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available online at www. hallowell.org

Sign Number: 14
Location: Cotton Mill Apartments north west corner
Method of Display: Steel pole

Sign14-1The availability of cheap cotton from the South in the pre-Civil War years prompted local businessmen to construct a spinning mill here in 1845. During a typical week, it used 35 bales of cotton shipped from New Orleans and burned 30 tons of coal. About 200 employees produced 43,000 yards of fabric on 215 looms. The first steam engine used here was built by the McClench Iron Works at Sheppard’s Point. The finished cloth sold for 6 cents a yard, and each employee made 62 cents a day. The mill ceased operation in the 1890’s as many textile manufacturers moved south. Shoe companies occupied the building from 1920 to 1966. It was little used until the Federal Advisory Council on Historic Preservation teamed with HUD in 1979 to transform the building into apartments for the elderly.

Sign14Le moulin de coton à Hallowell
L’abondance de coton bon marché au Sud des Etats-Unis avant la guerre civile poussa les hommes d’affaires locaux à construire un moulin de tissage de coton ici en 1845. Durant une semaine normale de travail, on utilisait 35 balles de coton importé de La Nouvelle-Orléans et brûlait 30 tonnes de charbon. La première locomotive à vapeur utilisée dans le moulin fut construite par la sidérurgie McClench à Sheppard’s Point. Environ 200 employés produisaient 43 000 mètres de tissu par semaine sur 215 métiers à tisser. Le tissu fini était vendu pour 6 centimes le mètre, et chaque employé gagnait 62 centimes par jour. Le moulin de coton cessa son activité dans les années 1890, comme beaucoup de manufactures textiles qui s’installèrent au Sud des Etats-Unis. Des fabriques de chaussures occupèrent alors le bâtiment de 1920 à 1966. Par la suite, le bâtiment resta presque vacant jusqu’en 1979, quand le Conseil Fédéral pour la Préservation Historique, en collaboration avec HUD (Logement et Développement Urbain), aménagea le bâtiment en appartements pour personnes âgées.

Photograph(s)/illustration(s) – Caption
S14-01 4 ½ x 4 ½ – “Cotton Mill Complex probably taken from the steeple of the South Congregational Church”
Vue du Moulin de Coton, sans doute prise du clocher de l’église South Congregational.

S14-02 – 8 ½ x 6 3/4 “Worker in the Cotton Mill.”
Ouvrier dans le Moulin de Coton.
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection – Photographer unknown
Interior of Cotton Mill (AH – HLC pg 59)

Sponsor Copy

The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Century 21 Alliance Reality.
Sign Sponsor – Cotton Mill Associates

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available nline at www. hallowell.org

Sign6
Hallowell house was designed and built by John D. Lord, who had previously supervised the construction of the Maine State Capitol building. Construction began in 1832 in the hope that it might swing favor towards Hallowell becoming the Capital of the newly annexed state. The hotel became home to legislators and hosted visits by Daniel Webster, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Theodore Roosevelt and L.L. Bean. It boasted a restaurant, a ballroom, and barber shop, as well as a bank and post office. There were fireplaces in each room, high ceilings and winding stair cases. From the 1920’s to the 1950’s the hotel was known as the Worster House and was famous for its fine restaurant and hospitality.

Hallowell House
Hallowell House fut construit par l’architecte John D. Lord qui avait supervisé la construction du capitole de l’Etat de Maine. La construction commença en 1832 dans l’espoir que Hallowell deviendrait la capitale du nouvel état. L’hôtel hébergea de nombreux législateurs et reçut la visite de Daniel Webster, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Thedore Roosevelt et L.L. Bean. L’hôtel possédait un restaurant, salle de danse, coiffeur, ainsi qu’une banque et un bureau de poste. Il y avait des cheminées dans chaque chambre, de hauts plafonds et des escaliers majestueux. Entre les années vingt et cinquante l’hôtel, connu sous le nom de Worster House, était renommé pour la qualité de son restaurant et de son hospitalité.

Photograph(s)/illustration(s) – Captions

S6-01 – 4 1/2×3 ½ – Promotional Card
Credit Carla Worster Gilley Collection

S6-03 – 10 ½ x 7 ½ – “Worster House Dining Room”
La salle à manger de Worster House
Credit Karla Worster Gilley Collection

S6-04 “Worster House Menu”
Un menu à Worster House
Credit Carla Worster Gilley Collection
If this
Sponsor Copy
The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Eric & Pamela Perry & the Perry Family

This Panel was sponsored by Granite Hill Estates

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available online at www. hallowell.org

MUSEUM IN THE STREETS

Credit – City of Hallowell, photographer unknown

Eliza Clark Lowell, City Hall’s Major Benefactor.

 

Sign Number: 3
Location: City Hall 1 Winthrop St.

In 1898-99, Eliza Clark Lowell, great granddaughter of Hallowell’s first settler Deacon Pease Clark, donated $20,000 for the construction of a City Hall.  She said, “Build it strong that it may last for years to come.”

Its auditorium served as a venue for school assemblies, dances and graduation ceremonies until the high school was built, and hosting variety shows, theatricals and other community events.

A century later, Row House, Inc. teamed with the City to renovate the beautiful old building for its centennial celebration. The exterior was sandblasted and the structure made fully accessible. Electrical and heating systems were updated. The cyprus wood interior was refinished.  Original Victorian paint colors were reproduced throughout the building, restoring it to its former beauty.

Credit – Quinn Collection, photographer unknown

Sacred Heart May Celebration – 1920s.

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The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group. 

The project was underwritten by Vaughan Homestead Foundation. 

Sign Sponsor – Row House, Inc.

Kennebec Turnout

Sign19Sheppard’s Point, the small peninsula located where Vaughan Stream enters the Kennebec River, was first settled by Briggs Hallowell, who built a house there to look after the business interests of his father, Benjamin Hallowell. Commercial activity flourished on the Point. A brewery and distillery established by John Sheppard was said to produce enough malt liquor to supply all of New England. By 1793 Charles and Benjamin Vaughan built a flour mill. In later years an iron works, machine shop, lumber yard and sandpaper mill were located there making the south end of town the industrial center of early Hallowell. In the late 19th Century the Knickerbocker Ice Company operated a large ice house on the point and shipped Kennebec River ice to customers around the world.

Sheppard’s Point
La pointe de Sheppard’s Point, située là où le ruisseau de Vaughan se jette dans la Kennebec, fut d’abord colonisée par Briggs Hallowell qui y construisit une maison afin d’y gérer les affaires de son père, Benjamin Hallowell. Une grande activité commerciale s’y développa. On disait qu’une brasserie et distillerie établies par John Sheppard produisaient assez de bière pour approvisionner toute la Nouvelle Angleterre. En 1793 Charles et Benjamin Vaughan y construisirent un moulin à farine. Plus tard, une forge, un atelier d’usinage, une scierie et un moulin à papier de verre s’y installèrent, faisant du sud de la ville le centre industriel de Hallowell à ses débuts. A la fin du 19ème siècle, l’entreprise Knickerbocker Ice Company gérait une grande maison à glace sur la pointe et expédiait de la glace par la Kennebec à des clients du monde entier.

Photograph(s)/illustration(s):
S19-01S – Sandpaper mill crew”
Ouvriers de l’usine à papier de verre
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection – Photographer unknown

S19-02C “Sheppard’s Point looking north.”
Sheppard’s Point face au nord.
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection – Photographer unknown

Sponsor Copy
The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Eric & Pamela Perry & the Perry Family

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available online at www. hallowell.org

Sign Number: 18
Location: Key Bank Building
Method of Display: Attached to Building

Sign18Hallowell’s early settlers brought their passion for education to their new home. The first town meeting in 1771 voted funds for public schools. A private school, The Hallowell Academy, founded in 1795, offered a top rate classical curriculum with a program in advanced mathematics and navigation for boys wishing to pursue careers at sea. Ezekiel Goodale opened “The Hallowell Bookstore – Sign of the Bible” in 1802, the first bookstore east of Portland. In 1815 it moved to No. 1 Kennebec Row, the brick building with the granite flood marker at the corner of Water and Wharf streets. By 1820 five major bookstores lined Water Street and made Hallowell a key component of the “Boston Book Trade” – supplying textbooks to schoolmasters and reading material of all kinds to the general public.

Importance de l’instruction

Les premiers colons de Hallowell transmirent leur goût des études à leur nouvelle patrie. En 1771 le premier conseil municipal appropria des fonds pour les écoles publiques. Un lycée privé fondé en 1795, Hallowell Academy, offrait un excellent programme classique ainsi que des cours de mathématiques avancées et de navigation pour les garçons se destinant à la marine. Ezekiel Goodale ouvrit en 1802 la première librairie à l’est de Portland, The Hallowell Bookstore-Sign of the Bible. En 1815 elle déménagea au No. 1 du Kennebec Row, dans le bâtiment en briques au coin des rues Water et Wharf qui porte la marque en granit du niveau des inondations. En 1820 cinq librairies importantes se trouvaient dans Water Street et firent jouer à Hallowell un rôle clé dans le marché du livre de Boston en fournissant des manuels scolaires aux écoles et toutes sortes de livres au grand public.

Photograph(s)/illustration(s):

S18-01 – “Hallowell Academy”
[no translation needed]
Credit – Hubbard Free Library – Photographer unknown

S18-02 – “Books published in Hallowell”
Livres publiés à Hallowell
Credit – Hubbard Free Library – Harold Strout

Sponsor Copy

The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Century 21 Alliance.
Sign Sponsor – MaxMedia

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available online at www. hallowell.org

Location: Hallowell Printing

Sign16-1The first newspaper published in Kennebec County, the Eastern Star, was printed in Hallowell by Howard S. Robinson on August 4,1794. In 1797 he published the first book of fiction printed in the District of Maine, “Female Friendship, or the Innocent Sufferer: A Moral Lecture”. During the next two decades Hallowell printers published 179 books, making it a center of printing and publishing at the time of statehood. By 1820 Hallowell had two weekly newspapers which represented the two political parties of the time: the Hallowell Gazette (Federalist) and the American Advocate (Republican/Democrat). Later, an abolitionist paper, the Liberty Standard, was published here as was the Maine Cultivator and Hallowell Gazette, and for 60 years the popular Maine Farmer’s Almanac.

Publications multiples

Sign16Le premier journal du Comté de Kennebec, le Eastern Star, fut imprimé à Hallowell par Howard S. Robinson le 4 août 1794. En 1797 il imprima et publia le premier livre de fiction du Maine: Female Friendship, or the Innocent Sufferer: A Moral Lecture. Durant les deux décennies suivantes les imprimeurs de Hallowell publièrent 179 livres, ce qui fit de la ville un centre d’imprimerie et d’édition majeur lorsque le Maine devint un état indépendant. En 1820, Hallowell possédait deux hebdomadaires représentant les deux partis politiques de l’époque, Le Hallowell Gazette (fédéraliste) et le American Advocate (républicain/démocrate). Plus tard, un journal abolitionniste, le Liberty Standard, se publia ici ainsi que le Maine Cultivator and Hallowell Gazette et, pendant plus de 60 ans, le fameux Maine Farmer’s Almanac.

 

The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Vaughan Homestead Foundation.

This panel is sponsored by Hannah Young Perry and the Perry Family.

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available online at www. hallowell.org

 

Location: Water Street State Boat landing
Sign13-1In the early 1800’s, it was said that if a Hallowell boy hadn’t been to the East or West Indies by the time he was 20, he “didn’t amount to much”. From 1785 to 1875, 229 ships were launched from her shipyards. Hallowell ships carried lumber and other products to the Caribbean and brought back “West Indies Goods”: sugar, molasses, rum and coffee. “Deepwatermen”, ocean-going sailors, took their ships to China and the East Indies. Whaling ships traveled as far as New Zealand and the South Seas. Before railroads, ships carried Hallowell granite around the world. Sixteen-horse teams pulled heavy loads of granite, on sturdy wagons called “galamanders,” down the steep hills to the Leigh and Wingate wharf at the foot of Academy Street where they were loaded on waiting vessels.

Port maritime sur la Kennebec

Sign13aAu début des années 1800, on disait que si un garçon de Hallowell n’était pas encore allé aux Indes ou aux Antilles avant l’âge de 20 ans, il “n’avait pas fait grand chose.” De 1785 à 1875, Les chantiers navals de Hallowell lancèrent 229 navires. Ces navires transportaient du bois et autres produits aux Caraïbes et en rapportaient des produits tropicaux : sucre, mélasse, rhum et café. Des marins au long cours, les Deepwatermen, naviguaient jusqu’en Chine et aux Indes. Des baleiniers se rendaient en Nouvelle-Zélande et dans les Mers du Sud. Avant l’arrivée des chemins de fer, des navires transportaient le granit de Hallowell un peu partout dans le monde. Des équipes de seize chevaux tiraient de lourdes charges de granit sur de forts chariots appelés galamanders en bas des collines jusqu’aux quais Leigh et Wingate au pied de la rue Academy où on les chargeait sur des vaisseaux.
“Schooner Jeremiah Smith at Hallowell Granite Company wharf and Captain Leslie Lyons of New Haven, CN”
Goëlette Jeremiah Smith au quai de la Hallowell Granite Company et Capitaine Leslie Lyons de New Haven, CN.
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection – Photographer Hunton Bros.

“Loading granite”
Chargement du granit.
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection – Photographer Hunton Bros.

Sponsor Copy
The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Vaughan Homestead Foundation.
This panel is sponsored by Matthew Race Perry and the Perry Family

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available online at www. hallowell.org

File: 13-seaport

Second St.
Method of Display: Post

Sign12LocHallowell’s first meeting house was Old South Congregational Church. It was a wooden structure built in 1796 but destroyed by fire in 1878. Lost in the fire was the distinguished bell tower designed by Charles Bulfinch and the organ which had been imported from England. It was rebuilt on the same spot between 1883-1885, with Hallowell granite replacing the wooden structure and a 127 foot steeple added. Hallowell pulpits have been filled with clergymen of notoriety, including prolific authors and acclaimed speakers. Hallowell native Rev. John Stevens Abbott wrote more than 50 books, including one, The History of Christianity, which was translated into several languages and won universal praise

Sign12L’église Old South Congregational Le premier lieu de culte de Hallowell fut l’église Old South Congregational. Cet édifice en bois, bâti en 1796, fut malheureusement détruit par un incendie en 1878. Perdus dans l’incendie furent le clocher délicat conçu par Charles Bullfinch et l’orgue qui avait été importé d’Angleterre. L’église fut rebâtie à cet endroit entre 1883 et 1885 avec du granit de Hallowell pour remplacer la structure de bois et on y ajouta un clocher de 42 mètres. La chaire de Hallowell accueillit de nombreux écclésiastiques célèbres, dont des écrivains prolifiques et orateurs acclamés. Le Rév. John Stevens Abbott, originaire de Hallowell, écrivit plus de 50 livres, dont The History of Christianity, qui fut traduit en plusieurs langues et connut une renommée mondiale.

Photograph(s)/illustration(s):
“First Old South Church”
Première église
Eglise actuelle
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection – Photographer A.F.Morse

History of Christianity – no caption

Sponsor Copy
The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group. The project was underwritten by Vallee Real Estate.
This panel is sponsored by Rebecca Jane Perry and the Perry Family.

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available online at www. hallowell.org

Sign Number:11
Location: front of Hallowell Fire Station
Method of Display: Affixed to Building
Permits/permissions required, date obtained: City

Sign11-1The Town House was built in 1828 and served as municipal offices, school, jail and community center. Sunday School programs were offered here as well as concerts, dances, roller skating and other events. The Hallowell Lyceum, an education and entertainment forum, met here. In 1832, citizens heard a lecture by Mr. Merrick on a new invention, the steam engine. In 1853 lectures were delivered by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Wendell Phillips, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Richard Henry Dana and women’s rights advocate, Lucy Stone. After the City Hall was built in 1898 the Fire Department moved here and has served the community at this location ever since. It boasts one of the finest collections of antique fire fighting equipment in Maine.

Sign11

Town House: Un bâtiment polyvalent
Town House fut érigé en 1828 et servit de mairie, école, prison, et centre communautaire. On y faisait l’école du dimanche, des concerts, bals, du patinage à roulettes et autres activités. Le Hallowell Lyceum, un groupe destiné à instruire et distraire la population, se réunissait ici. En 1832, les citoyens assistèrent à une présentation de M. Merrick sur une nouvelle innovation, la locomotive à vapeur. En 1853 Ralph Waldo Emerson, Wendell Phillips, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Richard Henry Dana et la féministe Lucy Stone y firent des conférences. Après la construction de l’Hôtel de Ville en 1898, la caserne des pompiers s’y installa et continue à servir la population locale. Elle abrite l’une des meilleures collections du Maine d’équipement ancien contre l’incendie.

Photograph(s) /Illustration(s) – Captions
S11-01 Firehouse with old apparatus – “Well-outfitted for the weather. 1925”
Bien emmitouflés pour l’hiver. 1925
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection – Photographer unknown

S11-02 – Firemen’s Association Band- “Entertaining and protecting.”
La fanfare des pompiers – “Divertissement et protection”
Credit – Hubbard Free Library Collection – Photographer McIntosh

Sponsor Copy
The Hallowell Museum in the Streets is a project of Row House Inc. and the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, made possible by Patron Grants from Gardiner Savings Bank of Maine, Mattson Development, LLC and The Wolfington Auto Group.
The project was underwritten by Hattie’s Chowder House.

Sign Sponsor – Hallowell Firemen’s Association

A Museum Tour Guide is available at the Hallowell City Hall, Hubbard Free Library and at many city merchants. The Guide and links to more information about Hallowell are available online at www. hallowell.org